return to pet health
Arthritis in DogsArthritis (osteoarthritis) is a degenerative disease usually occurring in older dogs. When you see your dog exhibiting loss in mobility, limping, stiffness in joints, soreness when touched in certain areas, difficulty in getting up, and indiciating pain, your dog may have arthritis. There are holistic remedies for dogs with arthritis such as: MSM,DMSO,
S.O.D. a powerful anti- inflammatory
flaxseed oil -another powerful anti- inflammatory
Bromelain another powerful natural anti- inflammatory. Also Resveratrol. US Animal Nutritionals(Vetriscience) sells powerful antioxidants,Glucosamine Sulfate For Dogs and Cats
A nutritional supplement for joint and connective tissue health. Glucosamine is found naturally in the body, where it is used to synthesize the molecules that give shape, elasticity, and rigidity to such tissues as cartilage, tendons, ligaments, discs, and mucous membranes. It helps restore the thick, gelatinous nature of synovial fluid and joint tissues. Joint Discovery™ represents a combination of joint support nutritional factors Chondroitin Sulfate, Glucosamine, Methylsulfonylmethane, and Vitamin C. These naturally-occurring substances provide the building blocks for aiding joint and connective tissue health.
Each chewable tablet contains 400 mg Chondroitin Sulfate (Bovine Source), 250 mg Glucosamine HCl, 500 mg Methylsulfonylmethane, 40 mg Vitamin C, 600 mg Brewer's Yeast. Ultra Glucosamine™ For Dogs
A nutritional supplement to support joint and connective tissue health. The three forms of glucosamines, N-Acetyl Glucosamine, Glucosamine Hydrochloride, and Glucosamine Sulfate are naturally occurring substrates used by the body for the biosynthesis of special macromolecules called glycoproteins, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and proteoglycans. Glucosamines are part of the structural elements in cell walls, intercellular spaces, and connective tissues. Glucosamines give shape, elasticity and rigidity to such tissues as cartilage, tendons, ligaments, intervertebral discs, and mucous membranes. Glucosamine Sulfate and Glucosamine Hydrochloride help glycosaminoglycans to hold more water thereby increasing joint flexibility, cushioning ability and resiliency. N-Acetyl glucosamine is produced from Glucosamine in the body and supports proper functioning of the digestive tract lining. All three forms of Glucosamine are considered important nutritional factors
Traditional treatments are Rimadyl, a NSAID, Adequan, given by injection, and Palaprin, a buffered aspirin and EtoGesic or Deramaxx.
ARTHRITIS IN PETS
Biofactors. 2000;13(1-4):225-30. : Anti-tumor and anti-carcinogenic activities of triterpenoid, beta-boswellic acid.
Huang MT, Badmaev V, Ding Y, Liu Y, Xie JG, Ho CT.
Laboratory for Cancer Research, College of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8020, USA.
mthuang@rci.rutgers.edu

Boswellin (BE), a methanol extract of the gum resin exudate of Boswellia serrata, contains naturally occurring triterpenoids, beta-boswellic acid and its structural related derivatives, has been used as a traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory and arthritic diseases. Topical application of BE to the backs of mice markedly inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced increases in skin inflammation, epidermal proliferation, the number of epidermal cell layers, and tumor promotion in 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-initiated mice. Feeding 0.2% of BE in the diet to CF-1 mice for 10-24 weeks reduced the accumulation of parametrial fat pad weight under the abdomen, and inhibited azoxymethane (AOM)-induced formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) by 46%. Addition of pure beta-boswellic acid, 3-O-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, 11-keto-beta-boswellic acid or 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid to human leukemia HL-60 cell culture inhibited DNA synthesis in HL-60 cells in a dose-dependent manner with IC50 values ranging from 0.6 to 7.1 microM. These results indicate that beta-boswellic acid and its derivatives (the major constituents of Boswellin) have anti-carcinogenic, anti-tumor, and anti-hyperlipidemic activities.
http://www.arthritis-in-dogs.com/
"There are some 60 million dogs in the United States and Canada. About 10 to 15% of dogs suffer from arthritis and other joint stiffness, especially as they get older....Arthritis (osteoarthritis) is a degenerative disease characterized by chronic pain, inflammation of the joints and reduced mobility. Osteoarthritis is caused by the loss of cartilage in the joints. In normal joints, cartilage serves as a buffer between bones. Usually the body replenishes cartilage as it wears away. When osteoarthritis occurs, cartilage deteriorates faster than the body can replace it. Eventually, the bones begin to rub together, causing pain, swelling and loss of joint mobility"
Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 1999 Nov;25(4):899-918, viii. : Topical agents in the treatment of rheumatic disorders.
Rosenstein ED.
Arthritis and Rheumatic Disease Center, Saint Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston, New Jersey, USA

Topical drug delivery may be the optimal route for the treatment of localized musculoskeletal disorders because higher drug concentrations can be achieved at the sites of clinical significance. The rationale for the use of topical salicylates and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of soft-tissue rheumatic complaints and osteoarthritis is reviewed. Topical capsaicin offers another potentially beneficial therapy for the treatment of osteoarthritis of selected joints. Although there are extensive, uncontrolled experiences with DMSO that suggests its effectiveness in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, controlled trials yield conflicting results. The basis for the use of physical modalities such as phonophoresis and iontophoresis to improve topical drug efficacy is summarized.
DMSO - Selected articles: Treatment of Arthritis
DMSO (Dimethylsulfoxide) Treatments in Arthritis Supplement to The Art of Getting Well : Arthritis Rheum. 1987 Sep;30(9):1023-31. : Meclofenamate sodium monohydrate inhibits chemotactic factor-induced human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function. A possible explanation for its antiinflammatory effect.
Perez HD, Elfman F, Marder S.
Rosalind Russell Arthritis Research Laboratory, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.

Meclofenamate sodium monohydrate (MSM), a potent nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent, specifically inhibits chemotactic factor-induced human polymorphonuclear leukocyte functions: chemotaxis, degranulation, and generation of superoxide anion radicals. These effects of MSM were found to be dependent upon the concentrations of drug not bound to albumin (free drug), and were caused by its ability to interfere at both a receptor and post-receptor (i.e., a step distal to mobilization of polymorphonuclear leukocyte intracellular Ca2+) level. These unique actions of MSM may provide a partial explanation for its potent antiinflammatory effect.
t J Clin Pract. 2003 May;57(4):301-4. : COX-LOX inhibition: current evidence for an emerging new therapy.
Skelly MM, Hawkey CJ.
Banner 10000032
Division of Gastroenterology, University Hospital, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, UK.
Safe and effective drug treatment is an important objective of all doctors. In the treatment of arthritis, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs offer effective treatment but safety is significantly limited, largely due to gastrointestinal toxicity. Attention has recently focused on exploiting increased knowledge of metabolism of arachidonic acid to allow the development of safer anti-inflammatory drugs. Dual inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase are planned. These drugs may inhibit formation of both prostaglandins and leukotrienes. This review outlines the salient features of cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolism of arachidonic acid. The role of the eicosanoids in mediating inflammation and gastrointestinal integrity is delineated. Evidence is presented regarding action of licofelone, one COX/LOX inhibitor that is currently in advanced stages of clinical trials. This review examines the hypothesis that licofelone is an effective anti-inflammatory agent that does not cause peptic damage.

Vet Rec. 2003 Apr 12;152(15):457-60. : Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel group study of P54FP for the treatment of dogs with osteoarthritis.
Click here for JeffersPet.com
Innes JF, Fuller CJ, Grover ER, Kelly AL, Burn JF.
Department of Veterinary Clinical Science and Animal Husbandry, University of Liverpool, Small Animal Hospital, Crown Street, Liverpool. P54FP is an extract of Indian and Javanese turmeric, Curcuma domestica and Curcuma xanthorrhiza respectively, which contains a mixture of active ingredients including curcuminoids and essential oils. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group clinical trial of P54FP as a treatment for osteoarthritis of the canine elbow or hip was conducted to assess its efficacy and safety. Sixty-one client-owned dogs with osteoarthritis were recruited through first-opinion practices and examined at a single centre. After a two-week wash-out period, they were randomly allocated to receive P54FP or a placebo orally twice daily for eight weeks, and were re-examined after four, six and eight weeks of treatment. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed in terms of the peak vertical force (PVz) and vertical impulse of the affected limbs, as measured with a force platform, by clinical assessments of lameness and joint pain by the investigators, and overall assessments of the response to treatment by the investigators and the owners. The results from 25 P54FP-treated dogs and 29 placebo-treated dogs showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of the PVz of the affected limb. The investigators' overall assessment showed a statistically significant treatment effect in favour of P54FP (P=0.012), but the owners' assessment just failed to reach statistical significance (P=0.063). No serious adverse effects were recorded, but two P54FP-treated dogs and four placebo-treated dogs were withdrawn from the study because their condition deteriorated.
Ann Acad Med Singapore. 2000 Jan;29(1):37-41. : Traditional Indian systems of medicine.
Lodha R, Bagga A.
Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.

INTRODUCTION: A number of traditional systems of medicine exist in India of which Ayurveda is the most popular. Despite being in use for more than 3000 years, few properly designed trials have scientifically examined the clinical potential of Ayurvedic and other medications. METHODS: We reviewed the MEDLINE database to identify clinical trials conducted using traditional Indian medicines. Single case reports were excluded. RESULTS: Ayurvedic preparations have been successfully used for the treatment of bronchial asthma, ischaemic heart disease and hyperlipidaemia. Formulations containing curcumin were reported to reduce inflammation and disability in double-blind clinical trials on patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A number of products are reported to be useful in patients with acute viral hepatitis. A multicentric study by the Indian Council of Medical Research showed that a preparation from Pterocarpus marsupium was effective in reducing levels of blood glucose and glycosylated haemoglobin in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In another multicentric trial, patients with fistula-in-ano were randomised to surgery or application of medicated seton (Ksharsootra). Surgical treatment led to a faster cure but recurrence rates were lower with medicated seton. Administration of extract from Bacopa monnieri, to children with mental retardation, was reported to significantly improve short-term and long-term memory. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence-based studies on the efficacy and safety of traditional Indian medicines are limited. The essential ingredient in most formulations is not precisely defined. High quality studies are necessary to evaluate and compare the value of traditional Indian drugs to modern medicine.
Phytomedicine. 2002 Dec;9(8):681-6. : Bromelain reduces mild acute knee pain and improves well-being in a dose-dependent fashion in an open study of otherwise healthy adults.
Walker AF, Bundy R, Hicks SM, Middleton RW.
Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, The University of Reading, UK.
a.f.walker@reading.ac.uk

There is preliminary clinical evidence to support the contention that the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of bromelain help to reduce symptoms of osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis. However, there have been no controlled studies of its effects on joint health in healthy subjects who lack such diagnosis. The current study investigated the effects of bromelain on mild acute knee pain of less than 3 months duration in otherwise healthy adults. The study was an open, dose-ranging postal study in volunteers who had been recruited through newspaper and magazine articles. Two validated questionnaires (WOMAC knee health Index and the Psychological Well-Being Index) were completed at baseline and after one month's intervention with bromelain, randomly allocated to volunteers as either 200 mg or 400 mg per day. Seventy seven subjects completed the study. In both treatment groups, all WOMAC symptom dimension scores were significantly reduced compared with baseline, with reductions in the final battery (total symptom score) of 41 and 59% (P = 0.0001 and <0.0001) in the low and high dose groups respectively. In addition, improvements in total symptom score (P = 0.036) and the stiffness (P = 0.026) and physical function (P = 0.021) dimensions were significantly greater in the high-dose (400 mg per day) compared with the low-dose group. Compared to baseline, overall psychological well-being was significantly improved in both groups after treatment (P = 0.015 and P = 0.0003 in the low and high dose groups respectively), and again, a significant dose-response relationship was observed. We conclude that bromelain may be effective in ameliorating physical symptoms and improving general well-being in otherwise healthy adults suffering from mild knee pain in a dose-dependant manner. Double blind, placebo-controlled studies are now warranted to confirm these results.
J Assoc Physicians India. 2001 Jun;49:617-21. : Efficacy and tolerability of oral enzyme therapy as compared to diclofenac in active osteoarthrosis of knee joint: an open randomized controlled clinical trial.
Tilwe GH, Beria S, Turakhia NH, Daftary GV, Schiess W.
Department of Medicine, GS Medical College and KEM Hospital, Mumbai.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy and tolerability of an oral enzyme preparation (Phlogenzym) with that of an NSAID (diclofenac) in the treatment of active osteoarthrosis. METHODS: Prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blind study of seven weeks duration at a tertiary care centre wherein 50 patients aged 40-75 years, with activated osteoarthrosis of knee joint were randomized to receive phlogenzym tablets (2-3 tablets, bid) or diclofenac sodium 50 mg bid for three weeks. RESULTS: At the end of therapy (three weeks) and at follow-up visit at seven weeks there was reduction in pain and joint tenderness and swelling in both groups, and slight improvement in the range of movement in the study group. The reduction in joint tenderness was greater (p < 0.05) in the study group receiving phlogenzym. CONCLUSION: Phlogenzym is as efficacious and well tolerated as diclofenac sodium in the management of active osteoarthrosis over three weeks of treatment.
MotherNature.com
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=12665145&dopt=Abstract
1: Vet Rec. 2003 Mar 15;152(11):323-9. : Clinical evaluation of a nutraceutical, carprofen and meloxicam for the treatment of dogs with osteoarthritis.
Moreau M, Dupuis J, Bonneau NH, Desnoyers M.
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Montreal, 3200 Sicotte, PO Box 5000, St-Hyacinthe

The efficacy, tolerance and ease of administration of a nutraceutical, carprofen or meloxicam were evaluated in a prospective, double-blind study on 71 dogs with osteoarthritis. The client-owned dogs were randomly assigned to one of the three treatments or to a placebo control group. The influence of osteoarthritis on the dogs' gait was described by comparing the ground reaction forces of the arthritic dogs and 10 normal dogs. Before the treatments began, and 30 and 60 days later, measurements were made of haematological and biochemical variables and of the ground reaction forces of the arthritic limb, and subjective assessments were made by the owners and by the orthopaedic surgeons. Changes in the ground reaction forces were specific to the arthritic joint, and were significantly improved by carprofen and meloxicam but not by the nutraceutical; the values returned to normal only with meloxicam. The orthopaedic surgeons assessed that there had been an improvement with carprofen and meloxicam, but the owners considered that there had been an improvement only with meloxicam. The blood and faecal analyses did not reveal any changes. The treatments were well tolerated, except for a case of hepatopathy in a dog treated with carprofen.
Diacerein reduces the level of cartilage chondrocyte DNA fragmentation and death in experimental dog osteoarthritic cartilage at the same time that it inhibits caspase-3 and inducible nitric oxide synthase.
Pelletier JP, Mineau F, Boileau C, Martel-Pelletier J.
Osteoarthritis Research Unit, Hopital Notre-Dame, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
dr@jppelletier.ca

OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the ex vivo therapeutic efficacy of diacerein and its active metabolite, rhein, on osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage chondrocyte DNA fragmentation and death in the experimental canine model of OA. The study also aimed to explore the effect of the drug on the level of important factors involved in this phenomenon, i.e., caspase-3 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). METHODS: OA knee cartilage was obtained from dogs that had received surgical sectioning of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and were sacrificed 12 weeks after surgery. Cartilage explants were cultured in the presence or absence of therapeutic concentrations of diacerein (20 micrograms/ml) or rhein (20 micrograms/ml). Cartilage specimens were stained for TUNEL reaction and immunostained using specific antibodies for active caspase-3 and iNOS. Morphometric analyses were also performed. RESULTS: In OA cartilage specimens, a large number of chondrocytes in the superficial layers stained positive for TUNEL reaction. Treatment with therapeutic concentrations of diacerein (20 micrograms/ml) or rhein (20 micrograms/ml) significantly reduced the level of chondrocyte DNA fragmentation to about the same extent in both treatment groups (P < 0.006, P < 0.002, respectively). The levels of caspase-3 and iNOS in cartilage explants were also significantly decreased (caspase-3, diacerein P < 0.04; caspase-3, rhein P < 0.0003; and iNOS, rhein P < 0.009, respectively) when compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that diacerein/rhein can effectively reduce the level of OA chondrocyte DNA fragmentation and death under the present experimental conditions. This effect is mediated by a decrease in the level of caspase-3 expression, which could possibly be related in part to the reduced level of iNOS and secondarily to NO production. These findings provide additional new information about the mechanisms of action of diacerein on the progression of OA.
Phytomedicine. 2002 Dec;9(8):681-6. : Bromelain reduces mild acute knee pain and improves well-being in a dose-dependent fashion in an open study of otherwise healthy adults.
Walker AF, Bundy R, Hicks SM, Middleton RW.
Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, The University of Reading, UK.
a.f.walker@reading.ac.uk

There is preliminary clinical evidence to support the contention that the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of bromelain help to reduce symptoms of osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis. However, there have been no controlled studies of its effects on joint health in healthy subjects who lack such diagnosis. The current study investigated the effects of bromelain on mild acute knee pain of less than 3 months duration in otherwise healthy adults. The study was an open, dose-ranging postal study in volunteers who had been recruited through newspaper and magazine articles. Two validated questionnaires (WOMAC knee health Index and the Psychological Well-Being Index) were completed at baseline and after one month's intervention with bromelain, randomly allocated to volunteers as either 200 mg or 400 mg per day. Seventy seven subjects completed the study. In both treatment groups, all WOMAC symptom dimension scores were significantly reduced compared with baseline, with reductions in the final battery (total symptom score) of 41 and 59% (P = 0.0001 and <0.0001) in the low and high dose groups respectively. In addition, improvements in total symptom score (P = 0.036) and the stiffness (P = 0.026) and physical function (P = 0.021) dimensions were significantly greater in the high-dose (400 mg per day) compared with the low-dose group. Compared to baseline, overall psychological well-being was significantly improved in both groups after treatment (P = 0.015 and P = 0.0003 in the low and high dose groups respectively), and again, a significant dose-response relationship was observed. We conclude that bromelain may be effective in ameliorating physical symptoms and improving general well-being in otherwise healthy adults suffering from mild knee pain in a dose-dependant manner. Double blind, placebo-controlled studies are now warranted to confirm these results

arthritis articles and supplements
hipdysplasia


Novel Milk Protein Concentrate with Biological Activity and Nutraceutical Functions
D. A. GINGERICH1, Y. Z. Lee, K. Kiser, J. D. Strobel, J. Lange, C. McPhillips, J. P. Fuhrer, and R. C.
Stohrer. (1) SMBI, Suite 400, 6954 Cornell Road, Cincinnati, OH 45242
We have, over the years, described therapeutic benefits of milk, developed proprietary methods of enhancing its bioactivity, and verified health benefits in clinical trials. Traditionally, the bioactivity in milk is attributed to high MW proteins including antibodies, casein, lactoferrin, TGF-b2, etc., with their well-known biological effects. We have discovered that milk also contains novel, low MW, dialyzable, non-protein micronutrients that are bioactive, and have demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertensive activities of these micronutrients.
We recently developed a proprietary method of producing milk protein concentrate which preferentially concentrates both high and low MW classes of bioactivity in a single nutraceutical ingredient, Stolle Milk Protein Concentrate (SMPC). We have tested SMPC for anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertensive activities in standard pharmacological models including the rat paw edema test, the 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) mouse ear inflammation model, and the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model. To summarize our results: 1. Rat paw edema: SMPC inhibits swelling significantly (p<0.05) at doses as low as 10 mg/kg when given by gavage one hour before carrageenan challenge. 2. Mouse ear edema: Organic extracts of SMPC applied topically to TPA-stimulated ears inhibit swelling by 60% compared to untreated controls. 3. Blood pressure: SMPC fed to SHR rats at 2% wt/wt of chow significantly (p<0.001) reduced blood pressure over the 6-week study period.
These and other results indicate that bioactivity in milk, previously shown to be clinically useful, has indeed been captured in SMPC. SMPC, therefore, has nutraceutical potential for inflammatory conditions (e.g. arthritis), cardiovascular health, etc. as an ingredient in food or beverage products. Use of client-specific outcome measures to assess treatment effects in geriatric, arthritic dogs: controlled clinical evaluation of a nutraceutical.

Gingerich DA, Strobel JD.
Stolle Milk Biologics, 6954 Cornell Road, Suite 400, Cincinnati, OH, 45242, USA.
Vet Ther 2003 Spring;4(1):56-66
A questionnaire method was designed for dog owners to monitor the orthopedic disabilities of their pets for evaluation of a nutraceutical with joint health claims. Fifty large-breed dogs, 7 to 12 years of age, presenting with signs of osteoarthritis, were randomly allocated to placebo and active treatment groups. Degree of disability was assessed by physical examination, a standard questionnaire on daily activities, and a case-specific questionnaire that monitored specific impairments of each dog. The test product was a special milk protein concentrate (SMPC) from hyperimmunized cows, previously shown to express antiinflammatory and antiarthritic activity in humans. After a 1-week run-in period of dosing with placebo, each dog was randomly assigned to a treatment and given gelatin capsules containing either SMPC or a placebo twice daily for 8 weeks. Overall improvement was noted in 68% and 35% of the SMPC and placebo groups, respectively. Significant (P <.05) improvement in mean standardized and patient- specific questionnaire scores and in owner global assessments was detected in the SMPC group but not in the placebo group. Compared with the placebo group, the treatment response was significantly better in the SMPC group with regard to case-specific scores (P <.001) and owner global assessments (P =.004). The product was well tolerated and serum chemistry findings remained within normal limits.

Sea Mobility Jerky Sticks For Dogs - Beef
Sea "Mobility" provides mobility enhancement and flexibility improvement from the natural power of Sea Cucumber, MSM, and Glucosamine! Our newest product is a real beef (USDA) jerky strip, super- powered with nutraceuticals to help maximize joint function when joint mobility is critical for your dog's lifestyle. Excellent for dogs from puppies to "Seniors". Great for any dog that can't swallow a pill or capsule.
Available Sizes: Approx. 22 Pieces
besides other Ark Natural products at discount.